Canoe Paddle Nearly Impales Florida Driver

And people still don't know the difference between an oar and a paddle

Image courtesy Florida State Patrol.

The paddle lodged in the windshield just inches from where the driver’s head would have been. Image courtesy Florida State Patrol.

A Florida woman was nearly impaled by a flying canoe paddle that pierced the windshield of her SUV, according to the Florida Highway Patrol. Christina Theisen, 33, was driving west on Interstate 74 when the aluminum paddle fell from a motor home in front of her Chevy Suburban. Troopers say she ran over the paddle, which then flipped up and pierced the driver's side windshield.

Thiesen ducked the paddle, which came through the windshield handle-first.

“When it came at me, the first reaction was to duck to the right, and that probably saved my life,” she told the Sun-Sentinel.

Theisen narrowly avoided impalement, and kept her rig on the road. She stopped on the westbound side of the interstate near mile marker 37. Photos taken by state troopers show how close she came to a serious or even fatal injury. After the accident, the paddle remained in the windshield and the interior of the vehicle was covered in broken glass.

Theisen's instincts prevented a tragedy. The same cannot be said for the dozens of media outlets that described the projectile as a "boat oar."

Lamestream media, please. That is not a boat oar. That is an Attwood Marine 5' Aluminum Canoe Paddle, available for $12.96 at your local Walmart Superstore. The top hand goes on the T-Grip, and it should always be transported inside your vehicle.

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If this had been an oar, it probably would have been fatal. Photo courtesy Florida State Patrol.

If this had been an oar, it probably would have been fatal. Photo courtesy Florida State Patrol.