Pushin’ Water for Pelagics on Light Gear

Thanks to space age materials, crazy dedication to R & D, and braided/spectra lines, increasingly lighter gear can be used to fish in legit pelagic situations. YouTube frame capture, TCKayakFishing.

Thanks to space age materials, crazy dedication to R & D, and braided/spectra lines, increasingly lighter gear can be used to fish in legit pelagic situations. YouTube frame capture, TCKayakFishing.

By Mike Stevens

I just bought a 60-inch name-brand television for under $900. It replaced a generic 42-inch plasma that I paid $2200 for. My new knock-around 12-megepixel camera was $150, and it took over for my 6-MP Canon that I threw down $600 for. By now, most of you should be familiar with this somewhat frustrating phenomena that, these days, makes you want to not buy anything because you are afraid it is about two years away from "old school" status, so you just continue to hold out for the next big thing. I'm talking to you iPhone zombies.

Smaller, lighter, faster, more capable. Where does it end?

Certainly not in fishing tackle, although it might not move as fast as electronics. Take this guy for example. He is fishing in blue water off the coast of southern Florida with the same size rod and reel that I grew up using for light bass applications in freshwater. His setup would be right at home fishing 8-pound line for largemouth, inshore or greenwater off any coast, or drowning nightcrawlers for catfish in some farm pond. But, thanks to space age materials, crazy dedication to R & D, and braided/spectra lines, increasingly lighter gear can be used to fish in legit pelagic situations.

The featured angler here happens to be Brian Nelli, kayak fishing pro and guide with south Florida's Pushin' Water Guide Service. Not that you have to be a pro to take advantage of all this innovation. Like everything else, it's only becoming cheaper and more widely available.

Also worth mentioning, the fact that a big fish towing a kayak creates plenty of built-in drag will keep we yakkers ahead of the curve when it comes to getting away with catching big fish on little gear. But that has always been the case.

As far as the action in this video, we were partial to right around the 2:20 mark when the sailfish's head wags seem to hit right along with the beat of the music, and dangerously close to sending the camera into the drink.