Dial in Plastics for Kayak Bass – Jackson Kayak Tip of the Week

Jackson Kayak Tip of the Week

Tray Collins like the clear water of small rivers and creeks to dial in plastics to the habits of the local fish. Tray Collins Photo

Tray Collins like the clear water of small rivers and creeks to dial in plastics to the habits of the local fish. Tray Collins Photo

Jackson Kayak Tip of the Week

By Tray Collins

Looking to catch more big bass from your kayak? While it seems that big waterways are more likely to hold big fish, it’s really putting in the practice and taking the time to dial in your plastics that opens the door to the big ones.

Big fish don't come easy; they have lived in your favorite fishing holes day in and out for many years. If you have visited these places and only caught smaller fish, that doesn't necessarily mean there aren't any big fish swimming around. It may be your presentation that's keeping them off the end of your line.

Among many things, the larger fish in a waterway have learned the natural colors and movements of their forage; they also know when something unnatural enters their space. If your plastic moves through their area too quick, doesn't match the color of their forage, or just doesn't seem natural, you could be wasting a lot of time. We often have just one chance to make the right presentation to a big fish.

Like any other sport, those who are consistently successful have spent a great deal of time practicing. Most have done so through years of trial and error while fishing for big fish, but the more effective way is to find a creek or small river close to home where you can dial in your plastics.

Dial In A Plastic Lure
Dialing in a plastic lure is the process of pairing the proper line, weight, and hook with the correct color of a plastic for the environment it is being presented in. A few things are tested by the process; namely, the fall rate of a bait, the movement of its appendages, and the reaction of the fish within these areas.

Small waterways are the perfect place to dial in plastic lures. They're void of boat traffic and are rarely visited by other anglers, but hold good numbers of fish. These places also have a lot of different cover to throw to, and changes in water clarity and current flow occur frequently.

What to take
A pair of polarized glasses is a must, as well as your favorite fishing rod. Bring along different sized weights and hooks, and a variety of line types and tests. As for your plastics, instead of taking a lot of different plastics take a few different types in a lot of colors. Be sure to take some snacks and your favorite cool beverage too.

What to Do
Start out in a clear section of the creek or river, this means finding some type of hard bottom like sand, gravel, or rock. These areas will remain clear more often than not. With clear water you'll be able to make changes to your baits and watch any differences in how they fall, whether or not appendages move as they should, and the fish's reaction to your offering. Once you've mastered clear water you can move to other areas with more current or stained water, and repeat the process.

Dialing-in plastic lures allows you to build confidence in what you throw and know exactly what to offer that trophy fish sitting in your favorite fishing hole.

For more tips and information, check out Tray’s website.

Big fish in skinny water can happen more often that you think with the proper presentation.

Big fish in skinny water can happen more often that you think with the proper presentation.