End at Alseseca

Currents series finale finishes with a video on Mexico's beloved river

For the last decade, the Alseseca has been garnering attention from big-name kayakers around the world. Its seemingly endless miles of classic rapids, famous drops such as Silencia and the Tomatas and numerous sections make the Alseseca the river paddlers love to run and filmmakers love to shoot. This Monday, April 8, Five2Nine released its final episode of Currents, offering a different angle to Mexico’s jewel river.

“If you Google Alseseca, you’re going to get a lot of videos and posts from people who travel there, but not much of anyone who lives there,” Mike McKay, web TV producer and filmmaker, said. “Over my time traveling there, those people have become very dear friends to me, and those are the ones that make me think of Mexico.” McKay wanted to premiere their faces because they paddle the Alseseca more than anyone else. “I wanted to highlight that river for what it was.”

In the same respect, a lot of international paddlers opened up the river for everyone. A timeline of the first descents runs through the middle of the video, highlighting names such as Ben Stookesberry, Aniol Serrasolses and Rafa Ortiz. The Jackson family have contributed much to the annual Alseseca Race, organized and run by Aventurec. Tom McCewan has helped grow the sport in Mexico through Liquid Adventures.

Alseseca was a great finale for McKay, and Currents has been been a life-changing project. Now that McKay has completed his series, he knows exactly what he wants to do next. “I’m going kayaking.”

Currents v2_8: Rio Alseseca from Five2Nine on Vimeo.

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  • Korban Dallas

    Yeah, go there and hope you don’t get beheaded. I won’t go to Mexico ever again.

    • petermarks

      Heck, you can go there and be killed by not landing correctly when going over any of the falls as all it takes is to hit a rock at the bottom of the falls and not being able to surface and it will be all over. The fun of kayaking makes it worth it and as long as one knows there’s a lot of water flow in a particular river one wants to run they have a better chance of not hitting rocks when descending a water fall. I was a kayaker in my younger days and now I like sailing a sailing kayak in open water and not on a river.

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