Featured

Virtual Coach: Peeling Out of an Eddy with Paul Kuthe

Peeling out is a river skill that all whitewater boaters practice every day they spend on moving water. From leaving the put-in eddy to navigating down the river, being able to enter and exit eddies gracefully is essential. Even advanced paddlers take pleasure in a smooth peel out into fast-moving current and feeling the rush of acceleration to the river’s speed.

All Start Paddling

Let’s Boof

04.09.2013

After rolling, boofing may be the most sought-after skill for whitewater paddlers. Nailing the boof means getting some air, clearing the hole at the bottom and hitting that perfect landing without compromising the spine.

There are a lot of pieces to the boof and many nuances to keep in mind. We have compiled all the tips and tricks we know on how, when and where to the boof.

Bugging out? Eddy’s Got Answers

04.05.2013

Eddy’s got answers regarding eating leather boots and bug repellants.

An Aquaphile Story

04.03.2013

For the last decade, the smoky joint Under-the-Hill Saloon has also served as the headquarters for the Phatwater Challenge, a 42-mile race that finishes at the boat ramp below this bar in Natchez, Mississippi.

Gallery—Benjamin Hjort

04.01.2013

Gallery – Upper Valldal River, Norway

Testing Boundaries

03.28.2013

Rivers carve deep canyons and divide hostile neighbors. They cut pathways through lawless country, and beckon us to follow. It’s no wonder that river-runners have their own canon of unspoken boundaries that, from time to time, they feel compelled to cross.

Back for More This is the Sea

03.04.2013

It’s been almost a decade since British paddler and filmmaker Justine Curgenven redefined sea kayaking with the launch of her first This is the Sea video. The film injected excitement and youthful vigor into ocean paddling, capturing the thrills of long-boat surfing and the drama of expedition paddling to battle the stereotype that sea kayaking was a sport for graybeards in floppy hats. Curgenven followed up with another three TITS volumes, driving the rough-water sea kayaking trend and inspiring countless paddlers to set off on their own adventures on the world’s oceans.

Gallery – Benjamin Hjort

12.01.2012

Gallery – Upper Valldal River, Norway

Two Men Enter, One Team Wins

12.01.2012

The Robe race is among a handful of Pacific Northwest creek races for two-person teams, including B.C.’s Callaghan Creek Race and Washington’s Little White Salmon Race. Teams start together, and the clock stops when the second paddler crosses the line.

Convergences

12.01.2012

Where tectonic upheaval flatlines and the Brooks Range runs out, infinite space welcomes the traveler like a door thrown open. Blue as the Caribbean, the Canning River spills our two rafts from between foothills into the arctic coastal plain.

Gallery – Adam Mills Elliott

12.01.2012

Oregon rafting team on White Salmon River, Washington.

Gallery—Charlie Munsey

12.01.2012

In the first two weeks of February 2002, seven of the world’s best and boldest paddlers completed the first descent of Tibet’s Upper Tsangpo Gorge.

Heavy Medal

12.01.2012

If you caught Vavinec Hradilek’s silver-medal performance at this summer’s Olympic Games, you witnessed one of the world’s most dynamic slalom paddlers lay down a near-perfect run. But you probably missed the 25-year-old Czech’s clever shout-outs to his steep-creeking buddies.

Gallery—Charlie Munsey

12.01.2012

Tobias Johansson on Virgin River Narrows, Zion, Utah

Thoughts from a legend

12.01.2012

Al Widing Sr. has finished the 120-mile AuSable River Canoe Marathon a record 33 times, including 16 consecutive finishes from age 63 to 79.

Gallery—Darin McQuoid

12.01.2012

Rok Sribar on Fuefuki Gawa, Nishizawa Canyon, Japan

Oversea Debris

12.01.2012

On March 11, 2011, the Tohoku earthquake, centered off the coast of northern Japan, generated powerful tsunami waves that slammed into 400 miles of the Japanese shoreline…The waves washed more than 5 million tons of debris out to sea. In the fall of 2011, some of the estimated 1.5 million tons of remaining flotsam—everything from buoys and boats to entire shipping containers—began arriving on North America ’s west coast.

Gallery—Charlie Munsey

12.01.2012

Fred Norquist on Toketee Falls, North Umpqua River, Oregon

Buyer's Guide

Buyer's Guide