Veteran Speaks Out to Save Boundary Waters

 

In this excerpt from the film Flush in the Wild, Sportsmen for the Boundary Waters follows Iraq War Veteran Erik Packard into the Boundary Waters for his first grouse hunt. When Erik returned from duty, he suffered from PTSD. After struggling for years, Erik experienced the healing powers of wilderness during a trip in the Boundary Waters.

Erik is the creator of the Save the BWCA Veterans Group and wants to use his story to help inspire others to discover the healing power of nature and to speak up to protect the Boundary Waters from proposed sufide-ore copper mining.

The 1.1 million-acre Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness stretches along the U.S./Canada border and is the most frequented wilderness area in the country. The waters are famous for smallmouth bass fishing and other forms of fishing and hunting. Erik was hosted by members of Backcountry Hunters and Anglers.

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The botched cleanup of a Colorado mine flooded the Animas River with the very same acids that are proposed to be used in mines adjacent to the Boundary Waters. Courtesy photo

The South Kawishiwi River, which flows into the Boundary Waters, is particularly threatened by copper-nickel mining proposals by Twin Metals Minnesota and others on adjacent unprotected public lands.

Exploration for copper/nickel mining sites was first allowed in 2012 when the Superior National Forest approved 29 permits. Vivid proof of the damage caused by mines was seen in 2015 when Colorado’s Animas River flowed yellow with toxic runoff from a botched clean-up attempt by the Federal government.

Watch the entire video on YouTube to find out how you can help Erik stop the destruction before it happens.

The famous paddling and fishing waters of the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness are threatened by mining. Wilderness Heals
The famous paddling and fishing waters of the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness are threatened by mining. Wilderness Heals